Chymeric Photography

Tutorials, Field Reports, Self-Advertising

Interact!

This is a modern website geared towards seamless integration, transparency, and interactivity! You can interact with us in the following ways:

Comment!

Commenting is simple, fast and fun!

Bear in mind, though, that our pages are versioned and change over time. If you comment on any specific content please specify the revision which you are referring to. You can find the identifiers of all revisions (the SHA checksums) by clicking the link displayed at the bottom of every page – which commonly looks like this:

Browse the history of this file or find static versions to cite via its GitHub page!

Once you are on the article’s GitHub page you may continue by clicking on the History button in the top right. The topmost revision is the latest, and you can copy the identifier (SHA) by simply clicking the button which appears when you hover the entry.

Fork!

If you would like to directly and 100% constructively contribute to our website you may do so by modifying its content!

Every article contains a link to its GitHub page at the very end. You can navigate to that link and fork the article (or our entire website) into your own Git repository.

If that all just sounded like gibberish to you – don’t fret! It’s actually quite simple. To get started you just need to register on GitHub. After you have an account the Edit buttons on the upper right of all our article pages will become active and you can start editing from a convenient and pretty point-and-click visual interface! Don’t forget to add yourself under the author: section after you have edited the file!

Now, wasn’t that easy?

Submit Pull Requests!

If you are satisfied with your work and would like to see it published on our blog (along with recognition of your authorship) you may use the convenient GitHub Pull Request button to ask us to publish your work. This will create a pull request page, where we can discuss how to best merge your file into ours.

Also, before submitting a pull request please make sure you have formatted your work according to our writing standards. A brief rundown:

  • Octopress-flavored markdown syntax (as seen in any and all of our own posts)

  • Each sentence or “block of meaning” (think long statements in parentheses) on a separate line

  • Citations formatted as links, like in the example below:

How to write citations in markdown:
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Your text contains a statement about [khat][giannini1986] and then some more things.

After a while your text ends, and then you append the following reference, which will not be printed in the document - but only used to format the link and link-hover text display.

[giannini1986]: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3734955 "Giannini AJ, Burge H, Shaheen JM, Price WA (1986). “Khat: another drug of abuse?”. Journal of Psychoactive Drugs 18 (2): 155–8."

The code above would look like:


Your text contains a statement about khat and then some more things.

After a while your text ends, and then you append the following reference, which will not be printed in the document – but only used to format the link and link-hover text display.

Cite!

Well, this is not that interactive really, but our commitment to versioning is first and foremost in order to allow people to cite our articles. Providing references is indispensable for making verifiable claims in media, publications, or social networks; and sadly, most of the blogosphere cannot provide that. Posts may change without a notice, or disappear altogether – and your citation? Puff!

We are different! Via the History section of every GitHub article page – which we diligently link to at the end of every post – you can obtain a static link which will remain the same and online for as long as our repository exists.

Is your citation so valuable that the immense trust – which I am sure you honor us with – still does not suffice? No problem! You can fork our repository on your machine or on your GitHub account. Now, even if we wanted to delete all of our hard work – we could not. You (and many others, we hope) would still have a copy.


Browse the history of this file or find static versions to cite via its GitHub page!

Comments